Postpartum Shoulder Work:
We love our little ones, even when they get bigger they will always feel like our little ones! And we will hold them and carry them as long as we can, but it comes with a price - a hunched back! So here are three great moves I recommend to do every day. As you do them, remember to engage your transverse abdominal muscle (*See video).

Arms Up The Wall Pose:  Stand close to the wall and reach the arms up placing the palms on the wall. Let the hands be placed shoulder distance or further apart, keeping the arms straight. Press the hands into the wall and imagine you could pull the wall down allowing the chest to lift upwards. Draw the front ribs away from the wall and reach the tailbone down towards the floor (working the posterior tilt action of the pelvis).

Arms Up The Wall Pose:  Stand close to the wall and reach the arms up placing the palms on the wall. Let the hands be placed shoulder distance or further apart, keeping the arms straight. Press the hands into the wall and imagine you could pull the wall down allowing the chest to lift upwards. Draw the front ribs away from the wall and reach the tailbone down towards the floor (working the posterior tilt action of the pelvis).

Wall Dog Pose: Slide the hands down the wall as you step away and bring your body to an "L" shape position, allow the knees to bend. You can turn your hands out slightly or come to your finger tips if this bothers your wrists. As you press the hands into the wall draw your hips back in space. Continue to draw the front ribs away from the floor.

Wall Dog Pose: Slide the hands down the wall as you step away and bring your body to an "L" shape position, allow the knees to bend. You can turn your hands out slightly or come to your finger tips if this bothers your wrists. As you press the hands into the wall draw your hips back in space. Continue to draw the front ribs away from the floor.

Pec Stretch at Wall: An oldie but a goodie! Place your forearm at the wall behind you, work to keep the elbow at the height or higher than the shoulder. As you turn your body slightly away from the wall, press your forearm into the wall to keep the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) integrated with the shoulder joint so you get the stretch in the pecs and biceps line and not in the joint itself.

Pec Stretch at Wall: An oldie but a goodie! Place your forearm at the wall behind you, work to keep the elbow at the height or higher than the shoulder. As you turn your body slightly away from the wall, press your forearm into the wall to keep the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) integrated with the shoulder joint so you get the stretch in the pecs and biceps line and not in the joint itself.

Supported Fish: Do this EVERYDAY! You can roll up a blanket and place the lower half of your scapulae on the top of the blanket roll. Have your knees bent (less stretch on the abdomen) and slide yourself up in the direction of your head so you can rest your arms on above the blanket roll. Keep this roll very small if you are post op or working with diastasis.

Supported Fish: Do this EVERYDAY! You can roll up a blanket and place the lower half of your scapulae on the top of the blanket roll. Have your knees bent (less stretch on the abdomen) and slide yourself up in the direction of your head so you can rest your arms on above the blanket roll. Keep this roll very small if you are post op or working with diastasis.